Organ Donation and Other Options

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jcz1
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Organ Donation and Other Options

Postby jcz1 » Sat Dec 14, 2019

I've had the "Organ Donor" box checked on my driver's license since I first got it. I just read an article tjat reminded me of one way this helps people, so I thought I'd share (and maybe get others thinking about becoming organ donors also :wave: )

We've all heard about the volcano tragedy in New Zealand. In addition to the numerous deaths, a large number of survivors have burns over as much as 90% of their body. This article is about a facility in Ohio that just shipped to NZ about 300 square feet of human skin, or enough to fully cover more than 15 bodies. (Unlike blood, skin needs to come from cadavers.)

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/as ... story.html

If you are or want to become an Organ Donor, be sure to tell your loved ones about it, since in some places they have to approve it no matter what your license says.

Another option is donating your body to science. One such group you can use for this is Science Care, and as a bonus, as this link says, you can do both (Organ and Science):

https://www.sciencecare.com/organ-donat ... u-do-both/

Another benefit to Science Care is cost savings. The process itself is free, and it also includes cremation.

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Bucketeer
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Re: Organ Donation and Other Options

Postby Bucketeer » Sun Dec 15, 2019

Good info Jim, thanx.
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Re: Organ Donation and Other Options

Postby Super Stacker PCB » Sun Dec 15, 2019

i’ve always been an organ donor. Never seen a reason why not to be.
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jcz1
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Re: Organ Donation and Other Options

Postby jcz1 » Sun Dec 15, 2019

I must repeat, make sure your loved ones know, in case the medical folks ask for permission.

Although, when I went through this a few years ago when my mom died, they never asked (perhaps due to her age and medical issues). And dealing with the process alone in the hospital, organ donation never even crossed my mind, even though we had discussed it many times over the years and I knew she wanted to.

A day or so later (fortunately before her cremation) I got a phone call from an organization wanting her corneas, which is why I think others would have asked if there were organs that were useful to them.

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Bucketeer
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Re: Organ Donation and Other Options

Postby Bucketeer » Sun Dec 15, 2019

I've heard it costs $30-50K for a kidney transplant (India, China & Thailand). Thailand has the best rep for medical operations. Livers cost more. I'm a regular blood donor, but the blood program is a load of crap. I get a t-shirt or a movie ticket for a pint of blood and blood components that sells for thousands.

I've had 2 blood transfusions. It is costly and requires 2 registered nurses to perform.

Blood, kidneys, and livers should have a marketplace and a market price.

If you're a blood or body donor, get it marked on your driver's license. Have you ever heard of an "organ harvest?

It isn't a pretty procedere.
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jcz1
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Re: Organ Donation and Other Options

Postby jcz1 » Wed Dec 18, 2019

Trump administration seeks to make thousands more transplant organs available

The Trump administration proposed new rules Tuesday that would make thousands more organs available for transplant, promising to hold dozens of poor-performing organ collection agencies more accountable and increase payments to living kidney donors.

The effort could yield 6,000 more organs annually, health officials said, a step toward reducing the huge waiting list for kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs. More than 114,000 people are on that list; many wait years for an organ. Thirty-three of them die each day.

The proposed changes, which would take effect in 2022, could increase organ donation and transplantation from about 36,000 annually to 42,000 by 2024, officials said.

The proposal includes new performance standards for the nation’s 58 organ procurement organizations (OPOs), which collect organs from deceased donors and send them to transplant centers.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national ... story.html

From the article, it seems that the process currently is that these orgs self-report how many organs were available and how many they procured.The new performance measures will use independent data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to establish how many eligible donors each OPO could have pursued in their efforts to recover organs each year.

“At the end of each recertification cycle, poor-performing OPOs could be decertified, but they’d be replaced by a better performing one,” Verma said.

This "better performing one" is one that handles and different geographic region and is then allowed to take over a bigger area. But that takes resources, etc, so it's not just magically going to improve anything.

Verma said she expects much of the growth in available organs will come from OPOs increasing their recovery rates for less-than-perfect organs. In many cases these are from older deceased donors, she said.

A Washington Post analysis last year found that as many as 27,000 people met the criteria in 2016 for organ donation — more than twice the number of actual donors. The vast majority of untapped donors were older than 50.

This number is unbelievable. Millions die each year in the US, but only 27k meet the criteria??? The WaPo analysis mentioned above has a graphic that narrows the 2.7 million deaths in 2016 down to 27k. Half that 2.7M was 76+, so that's one way they are considering increasing the donor pool.

From the remaining 1.3M, only 446k die in the right place. Hospice, nursing homes, even emergency rooms are no-go places, but that seems to me to be another area to look at.

From the "analysis":

Transplant surgeons are graded on the one-year survival rate of their patients but face no penalty when patients die on waiting lists. That leaves many unwilling to accept less-than-perfect organs, including those from older donors, which may not work as well, especially in very sick patients and younger recipients whose bodies more often reject them.

“What is the motivation to put our necks out there to use those organs if we are going to get in trouble?” said transplant surgeon Ryutaro Hirose, transplant surgeon and associate director of the University of California at San Francisco general surgery residency program.

Of course, I yelled at my monitor the obvious answer to this idiotic question, but the article itself had a reply as well:

Earlier this year, researchers hired by the industry to measure its performance wrote that the supply of organs could be dramatically increased by pursuing older, sicker donors.

“Even poor donor quality kidneys can improve patient outcomes compared with remaining on the waiting list,” they wrote.

OPOs lose about 25% (about 3,000 donors per year) because they are unable to secure consent. One OPO is mentioned as doing a poor job of talking to families, in part due to staffing issues. Which brings me back to my question about being "replaced by a better performing" OPO.

The article claims that there are only 8 possible organ donations (2 kidneys, 2 lungs, heart pancreas, intestines, and liver). Seems wrong - what about corneas (maybe not technically an organ) and skin (which is the largest organ)?

Step One: A patient near death is identified as a potential donor. The hospital medical team continues care until the patient's heart stops beating or brain-death is declared. The patient remains on a ventilator to keep organs healthy.

This goes against the process in my dad's death. They gave us charts that they said showed brain death, and suggested we discontinue life support. In his case that meant pulling the vent, but this damages organs if it takes too long for the heart to stop. Just like in my mom's case, no one discussed organ donation with us, and we didn't think of it ourselves. Perhaps the end-stage liver disease messed up the rest of the organs in terms of donation.

Even if there was a usable organ, I'm not sure what they would do. Showing us a chart and declaring time of death as the time we understand the chart seems a little vague and lacking finality or something. "Ok, he's now considered dead, please go home." :roll:

Step 3: The procurement team determines whether the patient is a registered organ donor, seeks consent from the family and takes over care of the patient.

Once again, this shows that checking the box isn't enough. (The article doesn't say if they walk away if the box wasn't checked.)

The article has a graphic showing the rest of the steps, which can take up to 40 hours.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics ... shortages/


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